a change in attitude

After a back and forth discussion between Divine Providence and Ananias. Finally Jesus said to Ananias, “Go for he is a chosen vessel of Mine to bear My name before Gentiles, kings and the children of Israel. For I will show him, many things he must suffer for My names sake.”

Wow! What a mouthfui and it’s unfortunate that most of the populace doesn’t have a clue, as to what had been said. Mostly, because the religionist within the church have screwed things up so badly. That more, and more people just dont’t want anything to do with religion of any stripe.

From apprehension, and fear, Ananias goes to the home of Judas. There he finds the blinded Saul. Having feared Saul because of his infamous hatred for the people of the Way. He now greets him as one of them. Saying, “Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus, who appeared to you on the road as you came, has sent me that you may receive your sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit.” Then the astonishing occurred because something fell from his eyes like scales. And he, regained his ability to see immediately. And then, he was baptized.

This padre has been pretty much paraphrased the events before and after Saul’s change of attitude which reaches back several recent discussions. For a quick review see Acts 9:1-18. But if you have the time those recent discussions are worthy reads. As will be the following two. Because they set the stage for finishing off the discussion as to how things got so bad. Cultivating with the finishing touches of discussions concerning Islam. The absolute worse scourge ever known to humanity. Superseding the evils Nazism through exponential ways!

As discussed previously, this padre honors Paul as the greatest churchman to have ever lived. Yet these discussions refer to him as Saul. That’s because when Jesus conversed with him, he called him Saul. And when Ananias visited him, he addressed him as Brother Saul.

For Saul, we don’t have an absolute declaration as to how he became known as Paul. Perhaps he thought a name change would make him less of a threat to the Jewish community. It makes sense because he wanted to be all things to all people. See 1Corninthians 9:19-23. And he referred to himself, as Paul, see Ephesians 1:1. As did Peter, in one of his epistles, see 2 Peter 3:15-16.